art, poetry

Maytree 24 – The Sound Recordist

It’s cover reveal time and we are thrilled to again be working with Saltaire based artist, Paula Dunn.

The Sound Recordist by Seán Street (Maytree 24) features the wonderful image, Evening Stillness created by Paula in 2020. The collection will be released on the 26 March 2021.

Seán describes the book as a sequence based on a life’s work in radio and a fascinating insight into British broadcasting.

About the author:

Seán Street is a poet, radio practitioner, teacher, and a writer of many prose
works that explore the philosophical nature of sound. He spent his schooldays
in Sheffield and student years in Birmingham where he embarked on a career
as an actor, initially at the old Birmingham Repertory Theatre, before moving
into radio. He has published nine full collections of poems, the latest of which,
Camera Obscura (Rockingham Press, May 2016,) examines his
preoccupation with time, space and communication, as did his anthology of
radio poems, Radio Waves (Enitharmon , 2004). His latest prose work is The
Sound of a Room: Memory and the Auditory Presence of Place. (Routledge,
2020.) Between 2017 and 2019, Palgrave Macmillan published his Sound
Poetics trilogy: Sound Poetics (2017) Sound at the Edge of Perception (2018)
and The Sound Inside the Silence (2019). Other prose includes The Poetry
of Radio – The Colour of Sound (Routledge, 2013), which was published in
2013, followed by The Memory of Sound – Preserving the Sonic Past, also by
Routledge, (2014). In 2015 Rowman and Littlefield published an updated,
extended and revised edition of his 2006 work, The Historical Dictionary of
British Radio. Other prose includes The Dymock Poets (Seren, 1994, new
edition, 2014) and The Wreck of the Deutschland (Souvenir Press, 1993), an
historical study of events surrounding the writing of Gerard Manley Hopkins’s
great poem. He is a regular collaborator with the English choral composer,
Cecilia McDowall and their work is published by Oxford University Press.
Cecilia and Seán are currently engaged on a major three-part work
commissioned by Glasgow School of Art Choir, to be premiered in 2022. In
the Spring of 2020, BBC Radio 3 commissioned their work, Photo 51, about
the crystallographer Rosalind Franklin.

Seán sees no divide between his practice as a radio writer, producer and
presenter, his research into sound aesthetics, and his poetry, pointing to the
subtitle of the second of his Palgrave trilogy to underline the fact that his
interest above all is ‘the aural minutiae of sand and other worldly
murmurings,’ and how deep listening helps to explain living. His most recent
poetry grows out of a lifetime working with sound, reflecting on its crucial
place within and around us, and this new sequence comes directly from
listening, using the metaphor of the microphone and recording machine as a
non-judgemental witness to Place and history, through pain and cruelty to the
consolations and inspirations of art and music and the natural world, finally
moving towards a quest for silence and stillness. Isolation, alienation, exile
and loneliness are themes; but above all the human voice – its dialects,
timbres and its sense of communicating a self – is a recurring motif.

Seán is Emeritus Professor at Bournemouth University, where he
gained his PhD in 2003. He now lives in Liverpool.

Sean Street | Home

Paula Dunn Artist

poetry, Uncategorized

Maytree 23 – Reflections

For our twenty third publication we are thrilled to announce a very special collaboration with Leeds Church Institute. Reflections: A Poet-Theologian in Lockdown Leeds features a collection of stories, observations and poetry by Leeds based author, Hannah Stone.

The project began in Spring 2020 as England entered the first lockdown. Hannah was appointed Poet-Theologian at Leeds Church Institute. Hannah’s brief was to comment on the impact of lockdown on the communities of Leeds, using poetry as a medium for reflection.

Initially presented as an interactive blog, Reflections: A Poet-Theologian in Lockdown Leeds is a collection of those blogs written during the most extraordinary year that we could ever have imagined.

Featuring contributions from Jane de Gay, Nick Allen, Amir Darwish, Brian Bilston, Carolyn O’Connell, and more, the book is both a celebratory and, at times, poignant vignette of lives lived through a pandemic.

The book will be distributed through Leeds Church Institute with a very limited number available through our on-line store.

Scheduled to be officially launched at the Leeds Literature Festival on the 05 March 2021 with an on-line event. Full details here: Reflections: A poet-theologian in Lockdown Leeds with Hannah Stone (leedslitfest.co.uk)

You can find out more about Leeds Church Institute here: Leeds Church Institute | Learning and Conferencing Centre (lcileeds.org)

About the author:

Hannah Stone was born in London and moved to Leeds over 30 years ago. She holds a BA in English Literature and Language (University of London), an MA and PhD in Theology (University of Leeds), and an MA in Creative Writing (Leeds Trinity University). As Hannah Hunt she enjoyed an academic career at Leeds Trinity University, where she was Reader in Eastern Christianity. She has been extensively published in her specialist fields of Patristics, early Christian spirituality and the Byzantine Church (including two monographs) and travelled globally to deliver conference papers. In addition, she is an Associate Lecturer and Honorary Research Associate for the Open University, tutoring both English Literature and Religious Studies. 

An MA in Creative Writing completed in 2015 propelled her into a new focus on writing, editing and facilitating poetry. Since then she has published four volumes of her own poetry, as noted above in acknowledgments; three major collaborations, An After Dinner’s Sleep (with Gill Lambert and Maria Preston, Indigo Dreams Publishing, 2015, which was the inaugural volume in the Wordspace Imprint she established to publish creative writing associated with Leeds Trinity University); Holding Up Half The Sky (with Rosemary Mitchell, Indigo Dreams Publishing, 2019); and, during lockdown, Fit to Bust (with Pamela Scobie, Runcible Spoon Press, 2020). She has also been published in many print and online journals. She comperes the monthly ‘Wordspace’ Open Mic; curates the monthly ‘Nowt But Verse’ discussions for the Leeds Library, and convenes the ‘Poets-Composers Forum’ for Leeds Lieder Festival. In July 2020 she became editor of Dream Catcher literary journal, published by Stairwell Books in York. She has also worked in conjunction with Leeds University’s Electrifying Women project to edit several volumes of creative writing responding to the centenary in 2019 of the Women’s Engineering Society. She runs poetry workshops and participates in spoken word events. Hannah collaborates with visual artists and composers, most notably Matthew Oglesby with whom she wrote the Penthos Requiem in 2018 (see website at penthos.uk).

In other lives, she sings in two local choirs, walks in the Dales, grows her own fruit and vegetables, volunteers at a community farm, and fosters young hedgehogs.  

Hannah was delighted to be appointed Poet-Theologian in Virtual Residence in the spring of 2020, with a brief to comment on the impact of Lockdown on the communities of Leeds, using poetry as a medium for reflection.  

art, poetry

The Weight of Snow – Pauline Rowe

We are delighted to reveal our first cover of 2021 and welcome back Pauline Rowe.

Author of the 2020 Saboteur Awards shortlisted, The Ghost Hospital, Pauline returns with another poignant and moving collection, The Weight of Snow.

Described as a family story of bereavement, the book focuses on the accidental death of a child and the reverberations of loss over generations and how grief becomes emotional inheritance and impacts upon formation and love.

The cover features the painting, Untitled by David Coldwell.

The Weight of Snow will be available from the 26 February 2021

poetry

January

This November sees the long awaited release of Sarah Barr’s stunning collection, January.

Review copies are now being sent out into the world and we’ve already received this wonderful endorsement from award winning poet, John McCullough.

Sarah Barr writes subtle poems that probe the edges of uncertainties, the details of objects and landscapes gradually revealing her speakers’ unease. The disjunctions in the title piece evoke the sudden leaps of a mind actively thinking, the white spaces between stanzas inviting us to imagine what’s going on beneath the clipped surface of the language. Elsewhere, simple phrasing holds carefully nuanced images: the menace of cracking ice, a long-married couple surrounded by ‘masks / and stiff-limbed, velvet-dressed dolls.’ The writing carries on unfolding inside the reader long after their eyes have left the page.

January 

This time I’m taking more notice – 
the sandbags, submerged fields,
flooded crypt, the marooned town.

There’s more water than the land
can use, or the skies hold.

Perhaps it’s natural
to shiver with excitement
at this odd, reflective world.

A swan wings upward, abandons
its mirror-image on the bright lagoon.

Are there going to be two
of everything, including me?

I think about new surfaces
and new below-the-surfaces.

Don’t miss out – January 27/11/20

art, poetry

Catching Air

We are delighted to introduce Vinny Glynn-Steed who will be launching his debut pamphlet with Maytree in early December.

Vinny, from Galway, is widely published in poetry journals and anthologies both in Ireland and abroad. His work has recently featured in Crannóg, Ofi Press Magazine, Boyne Berries, Windows 25th edition and the Cinnamon Press anthology. He was recently the featured writer in the American based journal Parhelion.

The cover features the painting, The Valley by David Coldwell.

Look out for more information on this stunning lyrical collection in the near future.